EQUINE PPID (CUSHING’S DISEASE)

Horses which are suffering from PPID can show a wide range of clinical signs, all of which are caused by the abnormally high circulating levels of the hormone cortisol.

In addition to laminitis another clinical sign associated with PPID is the development of an abnormal hair coat, ranging from mild changes in coat shedding right through to a full, long, curly, overgrown coat (“hirsuitism”). However, lots of horses with PPID do not develop this symptom.

Another common finding in horses and ponies with PPID is abnormal fat distribution – including abnormal fat bulging above the eyes (“supraorbital fat”) and a pot belly.

– Other “classic” indicators of PPID include:

– Excessive sweating

– Increased appetite

– Increased drinking and urination

– Lethargy / poor performance

– Repeating episodes of laminitis

– Recurring infections (eg: sinusitis)

– Loss of muscle condition, and/or a pot bellied appearance

Although a range of blood tests are available to assist the diagnosis and monitoring of PPID, the most commonly used test is the Resting ACTH test – where a single blood sample is taken to measure the level of the hormone ACTH which is abnormally high in untreated PPID cases.

PLEASE CONTACT US ON 0427 072 095 TO SCHEDULE AN APPOINTMENT TO DISCUSS PPID IN YOUR HORSE

(information adapted from Boehringer Ingelheim)